Volcanic Tongue Catalogue

Paul Dunmall/Chris Corsano
Identical Sunsets

ESP Disk 4058


Raging free jazz duo blat from saxophonist Paul Dunmall (here doubling on border pipes) and drummer Chris Corsano, marking Corsano’s first –fated! - appearance on ESP Disk. Following in the tradition of ESP’s first classic free jazz run, Identical Sunsets is an ass-blasting high energy side. The title track is a particular monster, with Dunmall’s ululating border pipes conjuring the ghost of Albert Ayler’s bagpipes with psychedelic overtones and raw folk passion. Corsano is, of course, amazing. One of the first releases from the revived ESP Disk that feels worthy of the label. Highly recommended. 

Tony Bevan/Chris Corsano/Dominic Lash
Monster Club

Foghorn Records FGCD-010


New self-released CD on saxophonist Tony Bevan’s label documenting a wild free jazz trio that pits Bevan on soprano, tenor and bass saxophones against drummer Chris Corsano and bassist Dominic Lash. This is an explosive set, one that owes more to the classic fire music modes of post-Coltrane improvisation than the dry stylings of the Steve Noble set. Bevan’s command of the instrument is staggering, blowing chunky, luminous lines that are full of mystery and atmosphere before cascading through the instrument’s most phantom registers, taking long, vocalised solos that push the extreme style of the Reverend Frank Wright into almost Urabe-esque territories. Bassist Lash blends beautifully with Bevan’s ferocious/melodic style while Corsano provides the bulk of the acceleration, pushing the group into the kind of aggressive vectors usually inaccessible to UK improvisers. Fantastic and highly recommended.

The New Blockaders/Thurston Moore/Jim O'Rourke
The Voloptulist

Hospital Productions HOS-144


Dream-team hook-up between a trio of the most important free-noise theorists of the modern age, the UK's New Blockaders and Thurston and Jim of Sonic Youth et al. Hard to work out who is doing exactly what here - though the presence of drummer Chris Corsano on the second track is pretty unmistakable - but the overall feel is of one of TNB's early Symphonie X works populated by thin strings of feedback, the crackle of electronic jack-to-jack friction and a subtle ring of bone. Beautifully eerie and a little more pro-drone than the bulk of TNB's work. Second track is just unbelievable, with a slow hiss of feedback torn apart by Corsano's triumphal, spirit/energy scattershots, marching a legion of ghosts all the way over the horizon. Highly recommended.